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Dyslexia Causes

(Also Known As: Dyslexic Causes, Learning Disorder Causes, Developmental Reading Disorder Causes)

(Reviewed by: Paul Peterson, Licensed Therapist)

What Causes Dyslexia?

The exact cause of dyslexia remains unclear, although recent studies on anatomy and brain imaging indicates differences in the brain processes of the dyslexic individual. In general, the brain is responsible for collecting all the messages relayed by the five senses. The messages provides a clue for the brain to determine what is taking place in the body, evaluates things, and then dictates the action to be done. 2

If a person is suffering from dyslexia, their sense of sight and hearing becomes mixed up and the brain cannot determine the proper action to be done. People suffering from this disorder utilize a different region of the brain in reading. Because the brain functions of a dyslexic are not functioning properly, reading becomes a tedious task on their part.

There are three kinds of dyslexia that can affect the language skills of children. The first kind is trauma dyslexia. Here the disorder takes place as a result of brain injury to the area that controls reading and writing. This is a rare kind of dyslexia.

In primary dyslexia, there is dysfunction, instead of injury, to the cerebral cortex. The people suffering from this disorder can hardly read above grade four levels and may have difficulty reading, spelling, and writing during adulthood.

Secondary or developmental dyslexia, on the other hand, results from hormonal development during the early stages in the life cycle of the fetus. As the child matures, this kind of disorder slowly diminishes. Developmental dyslexia is more common in males.

As a learning disability, dyslexia may have resulted from any of the following causes:

  • Slow rate of development and maturity by children belonging to the same age group. Consequently, they may not be effective with their school work.
  • Children with normal vision and hearing may have the tendency to misinterpret sights and sounds due to unknown illnesses in the nervous system.
  • Pre-natal injuries or during early childhood may result in learning disorders during the latter stages of life.
  • Premature birth or medical problems after birth can lead to learning disorders.
  • Learning disabilities may be a result of family genes and can be hereditary.
  • Some learning disabilities may be connected with irregular spelling, structured English, and pronunciation.

Dyslexics have difficulties in recognizing the phonemes, which is the basic sound that speech makes. As a result, the individual is having difficulty recognizing short and common words and pronouncing longer words.

The exact cause of dyslexia remains unclear although recent studies on anatomy and brain imaging indicates differences in the brain processes of the dyslexic individual. In general, the brain is responsible for collecting all the messages relayed by the five senses. The messages provides a clue for the brain to determine what is taking place in the body, evaluates things, and then dictates the action to be done.

Could You Have Dyslexia?

Dyslexia Topics

Related Conditions

Asperger's Syndrome – restricted social interaction, autism, learning difficulty
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder – inattention, hyperactivity, difficulty to concentrate
Mental Retardation – below normal mental ability, difficulty in learning, dysfunctional adaptive ability